Saying NO When You Want to Say YES - BodyHealth

Saying NO When You Want to Say YES

by Jeff Spencer February 17, 2016 0 Comments

Saying NO When You Want to Say YES

by Jeff Spencer


When I was going through the Boston airport the day of the Boston marathon after it was over it was wonderful to see the competitors in the official t-shirts and medals around their necks. And, of course, there were those hobbling around nursing cramps, strains, exhaustion and the usual cast of maladies associated with the endurance competitions.

A common conversation I heard a lot of, traversing the concourse to get to my flight, was how many injuries there were this time. Significantly more injuries than ever.

I’m always curious why that happens so predictably.

From my experience in sports at the highest level, the main culprit is over-training.

But, the problem is really the genesis of the over-training itself.

Why do people do it when most know better?

Usually, fear, that if they rest too much the competition will get the advantage.

And, this, of course, plays well into the often ill-timed headlines in magazines, newspapers and online media about the training programs of so and so and what they’re doing to get the extra edge to super-perform for an important event.

Reading that is like catnip to the over-training myth that’s, in a sense, built into our human nature that never wants to give any advantage up to anybody for any reason, especially with performances that are big yearly targets, like the Boston marathon.

The fear of loss of advantage is crippling and seen in sports, business, stage, art and every aspect of life.

And, within the context of important events this is magnified when a person is feeling really good as they taper into an event and their energy starts to build as reserves are being stored.

This is the deadliest. The mind, and well-intended others, often say, “Well, if I’m this good now just imagine how good I’ll be if I just do a little more since I’m feeling so good now.” When I hear that, I shudder as it translates to, “I’m going to be sick or injured just before the event.” I’ve seen it a million times.

So, whenever you feel just a little too good, look at your training log and if you see it’s the end of a moderately hard training block or back from a recovery period, pull back immediately and let the good fortune soak into your body so the peak will be there for you when you need it.

The hardest thing of all is pulling back when you feel so good. This restraint is perhaps the biggest distinguishing factor between those who do perform at their best when it counts verses those who don’t. Give it a try, you’ll be glad you did.

Jeff Spencer
Jeff Spencer

At just nine years old, I used to wake up at 4:30 a.m. to practice hitting a baseball up and down our street. That competitive spirit led to winning a national championship at just ten years old and then becoming an Olympian at twenty-one. For the past forty years, I’ve been a professional student of human achievement. I’ve been driven by this unshakable question: why do some people succeed and others fail? After retiring from professional competition, I went back to school to earned advanced degrees in health and wellness. In the decades since then, I’ve worked with athletes in nearly every professional sport, Olympic gold medalists, and millionaire entrepreneurs. I’ve had a front-row seat as I watched these world-class achievers do what they do. For more information: drjeffspencer.com



Also in BodyHealth

Is Monk Fruit the Future of Sweet?
Is Monk Fruit the Future of Sweet?

by BodyHealth Representatives October 10, 2018 0 Comments

Deep in the mountains of south China, Buddhist monks have meticulously cultivated a rare melon prized for its health benefits. 

Also known as “Buddha fruit,” luo han guo sustained monks in long meditations in spartan living conditions. It was even used medicinally to treat infections, coughs, and other illnesses. 

It is so prized the Chinese government has banned the export of its genetic material.
Read More
Lessons From Fibromyalgia: The Cellular Origins of Chronic Disease
Lessons From Fibromyalgia: The Cellular Origins of Chronic Disease

by BodyHealth Representatives October 10, 2018 0 Comments

“I feel like I’m constantly wading through mud. Like my brain is clogged up. My limbs are heavy and every little action requires a great deal of effort. My muscles are tired and shaky. It’s just like pushing through a bog all the time.”

This is the essence of what it is like to have fibromyalgia. The body’s energy stores are perpetually on empty. Body aches and joint pain plague every movement. 

Even the small actions of daily life are a struggle.
Read More
CJ's Lessons Learned... Biting Off More Than I Could Chew
CJ's Lessons Learned... Biting Off More Than I Could Chew

by CJ Hitz October 10, 2018 0 Comments

As some of you know, I picked up running again in the spring of 2008 after almost twenty years away from it. After finishing Ultramarathon Man: Confessions of an All Night Runner by Dean Karnazes, I was ready to start training for a 100 miler! No sweat, right? I remember how humbled I was after running 6 miles for the first time. After that outing along a treacherous Ohio highway shoulder, I decided to tone down the “100 mile zeal” a bit by signing up for a 50k tra...
Read More

Sign Up For The BodyHealth Fitness Newsletter