What You're Being Told Helps with Osteoporosis is Probably Wrong

by Dr. David Minkoff June 11, 2019 4 min read

What You're Being Told Helps with Osteoporosis is Probably Wrong

The following is adapted from The Search for the Perfect Protein.

If you believe what TV commercials say, taking calcium is the solution to osteoporosis. Just take it and you’ll be fine. If that doesn’t work, you could also try a bisphosphonate drug like Fosamax. That 1-2 punch will help you defeat osteoporosis, right?

Not exactly. This medication will make your bones look better on a density scan, but in reality, it makes them very fragile. In some cases, the drug even causes a condition called osteonecrosis, in which bone cells die, and the jaw bone disintegrates.

If your jaw doesn’t disintegrate, you still have to worry about side effects like joint and muscle pain, nausea, heartburn, and ulcers. Due to the small potential of benefit and high risk, I do not consider bisphosphonates a worthwhile treatment option.

But what about increasing your calcium intake. That has to help, right?

Yes, it does, but going that route does not address the whole problem. Let’s go below the surface-level advice to see what’s really going on with osteoporosis, then look at a case study of a sixty-eight-year-old woman named Betty we were able to help.

 

The Other Half of the Osteoporosis Story

Demineralized bone is rubbery like old celery—minerals only stick if a protein matrix is present. Bones are constructed like a 1950s lath and plaster wall; thin lath strips were nailed horizontally across wall studs, and then plaster was spread over them. The lath gave the plaster something to stick to, and created the wall interior.

In a similar fashion, bones need a dense matrix of protein as a structural foundation before “overlaying” the calcium. This foundation is collagen, the most abundant structural protein in the body. Roughly 50 percent of bone by weight is collagen, which is a protein, and osteoporosis occurs when there is a loss of collagen.

By rebuilding it, you can rebuild bones.

Collagen is made of amino acids and other essential components so that the mineral content of bone has something to attach to. Other critical elements needed to build bone are: vitamin D, vitamin K, and hormones (thyroid, estrogen, progesterone, DHEA, and testosterone). Vitamin B6 and magnesium help with collagen formation.

 

Targeted Exercise is a Critical Component

The other important factor in building bones is targeted exercise—the bones must undergo enough stress to stay strong. Experiments using deadlifts and squats, have shown great results if coupled with the nutritional advice listed above.

With proper instruction from a trained exercise coach or instructor, do three sets of ten repetitions of deadlifts and squats, twice per week to see results. These movements can be done with no weights to start, but as the person gets stronger, weights should be added. This type of resistance training is extremely effective at building bone.

In our clinic we have patients do the exercises on a vibrating power plate that was developed by NASA to help its astronauts fight off osteoporosis while they’re in space.

Our using the plate, our patients’ bone density improves at an even faster rate.

 

How We Helped Betty Regain Her Health

We often find low serum amino acid levels in women with osteoporosis.

When we give these women extra doses of amino acids and treat other factors within their systems that may not be in good shape, their bones re-mineralize.

This was the case with Betty, who came into the clinic after her regular doctor checked her bone density and confirmed that it was in the osteoporosis range.

He told her that she needed to greatly increase her calcium intake, and to begin taking Fosamax medication (sound familiar?). She had read reports of the medication’s potential side effects and wisely chose to seek another opinion.

After seeing her and running laboratory tests, we found the usual deficiencies that we see in this situation: low red blood cell magnesium and selenium, very low vitamin D and iodine, low pancreatic chymotrypsin for protein digestion, low serum essential amino acids, low progesterone and testosterone, bacterial overgrowth in her small intestine with a roundworm parasite, and nearly absent stomach acid.

She also had very low levels of estrogen, testosterone, DHEA, and progesterone.

We started a program to address her nutritional and hormonal deficiencies, and to improve her gut, digestion, and absorption. We also began the weight training program described above with a power plate, three times per week.

A recheck of her bone density in six months showed vast improvement, and after a year and a half, she was back in the normal range for her age.

 

Osteoporosis is Reversible

This case study shows us that these problems are reversible, and treatment can be administered by a knowledgeable nutritional practitioner. A good doctor knows what to find and fix, and then the body will take over—inherently, it knows what to do.

This is health restoration at its best.

For more advice on fighting back against osteoporosis, you can find The Search for the Perfect Protein on Amazon.

For the #1 Essential Amino Acid supplement that 99% utilized by the body to create new protein look HERE.

Dr. David Minkoff is board certified in pediatrics and served as codirector of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Palomar Medical Center in San Diego, California. With his wife, Sue, he cofounded LifeWorks Wellness Center in 1997, and in 2000, he cofounded BodyHealth, a nutrition company that offers a unique range of dietary supplements to the public and medical practitioners. A forty-two-time IRONMAN finisher, Dr. Minkoff is passionate about fitness and continues to train on a regular basis. He and his wife reside in Clearwater, Florida.

Dr. David Minkoff
Dr. David Minkoff

Dr. Minkoff graduated from the University of Wisconsin Medical School in 1974 and was elected to the “Phi Beta Kappa” of medical schools, the prestigious Alpha Omega Alpha Honors Medical Fraternity for very high academic achievement. He then worked as an attending physician in infectious disease, co-directed a neo-natal intensive care unit and worked in emergency medicine until 1995. In 1997, his interest in alternative and complementary medicine led him to open LifeWorks Wellness Center, which has become one of the foremost alternative medicine clinics in the U.S. His search to find a source of the highest quality nutritional supplements led him to establish BodyHealth in 2000, a resource that could provide doctors with the best possible supplementation and education for their patients. Today, the BodyHealth products are used by hundreds of practitioners and individual consumers who seek all-natural wellness and detoxification supplements with a demonstrated high level of quality and effectiveness. In addition to their use by patients looking to heal disease, the BodyHealth products are also used by sports enthusiasts interested in achieving and maintaining optimal performance. As a 42-time Ironman triathlon finisher, (including 8 appearances at the Ironman World Championships) Dr. Minkoff has first-hand experience to help athletes achieve optimum conditioning. His expertise in protein synthesis, detoxification, and nutrition allow them to run, swim, and bike faster and longer. Today, Dr. Minkoff is an alternative healthcare expert, guest lecturer, writer, tv and radio show guest. He also authors two weekly newsletters, the BodyHealth Fitness Newsletter and the Optimum Health Report.


Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in BodyHealth

Protein is the Key to Fighting Leaky Gut and Restoring Your Health
Protein is the Key to Fighting Leaky Gut and Restoring Your Health

by Dr. David Minkoff June 25, 2019 5 min read

The following is adapted from The Search for the Perfect Protein.

Today, many people suffer from a condition they may not even know exists: “leaky gut.”

You see, the gut requires adequate amounts of essential amino acids to regenerate itself every few days. If they are lacking in the body, then the gut membrane can become more permeable, creating an increased susceptibility to “leak” fragments from proteins and microorganisms into the bloodstream from the intestines.

As you can imagine, this is very bad. Some people contract infections from their own intestines, which can lead to a blood infection, resulting in sepsis or meningitis.

Read More
The BodyHealth Guide to Micronutrients
The BodyHealth Guide to Micronutrients

by Dr. David Minkoff June 19, 2019 7 min read

The word “micronutrients” sure sounds nice.

Health marketers use it as a generic catch-all term, but usually without any specific meaning.

It’s easy to have an idea about what it probably is –– small nutrients, right? –– and it’s easy to understand that they are probably important.

But what are they really? And what do they do? Are there different kinds?

This article will help you clear up the confusion so you can make an informed choice about your health and nutrition and what is or is not a worthwhile purchase.

Read More
BCAAs (Branched-Chain Amino Acids) vs EAAs (Essential Amino Acids)
BCAAs (Branched-Chain Amino Acids) vs EAAs (Essential Amino Acids)

by Dr. David Minkoff June 18, 2019 6 min read

BCAAs (Branched-Chain Amino Acids) are all the craze these days. Pushed by supplements companies and hyped by paid sponsors, what are these supplements, what do they actually do, and are they worth it?
Read More